Apple Valley Dental Discussion

Posts for category: Oral Health

By Apple Valley Dental
January 21, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
EncourageYourCollege-BoundChildtoPracticeGoodOralHealthHabits

It's a big transition when your child enters college — for both of you. You may find “cutting the apron strings” a little rocky at times.

But like most parents, you'll soon condense what you still want your college kid to do down to a few major habits and choices. Be sure to keep health, diet and lifestyle choices on that list, areas which could have the most effect on their long-term health and well-being.

That should include dental care. Hopefully, they've already developed good hygiene habits like daily brushing and flossing and regular dental visits. But, on their own now, they're faced with other choices that could affect their dental health.

For example, eating a balanced, nutritious diet is necessary for a healthy mouth. That includes limiting sugar intake, especially when snacking. Disease-causing oral bacteria thrive on carbohydrates like sugar. These bacteria also secrete acid, which at consistently high levels can erode tooth enamel.

Tobacco smoking and excessive alcohol affect teeth and gums because both can inhibit secretion of saliva. Besides containing antibodies that fight infection, saliva also neutralizes mouth acid. A dry mouth caused by these habits, could put their mouth at higher risk for disease.

Your college student might also be influenced by the fashion of their peers to display piercings. Mouth piercings with lip or tongue hardware in particular can damage teeth. The constant movement and friction erodes enamel or may even cause a tooth fracture. If possible, try to steer them to self-expression that poses less risk to their dental health.

There's one other area that, believe it or not, could impact dental health: sex. While each family handles this particular subject differently, be sure your child knows that some forms of sexual activity increase the risk for contracting the human papilloma virus (HPV16). Among its many destructive outcomes, HPV16 profoundly raises the risk of oral cancer, a rare but deadly disease with a poor survival rate.

Going from home to college is a big step for a young person — and their parents. As a parent, you can help steer them to practice good habits and make wise choices that will protect their lives and health and, in particular, their teeth and gums.

If you would like more information on helping your college student maintain their dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “10 Health Tips for College Students.”

By Apple Valley Dental
January 19, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Dental Emergencies  

Dental emergencies can cause even the most calm, cool, and collected individuals to panic. Luckily, your dentist can help you prepare for dental emergencythese uncomfortable situations and know exactly what to do to save your tooth and dental health. Find out everything you need to know about dental emergencies and more with Dr. Samuel Kim at Apple Valley Dental in Apple Valley, CA.

What is considered a dental emergency? 
Dental emergencies often involve injuries to the mouth which do serious damage to one or more teeth. In addition to damage to the teeth, a dental emergency can also include damage to the oral tissues like the cheeks, tongue, or gums. One of the most common dental emergencies occurs when an injury or accident knocks a tooth from the mouth, fractures a tooth, or significantly loosens the tooth. However, dental emergencies can also occur when a tooth becomes severely infected and abscessed.

What should I do during a dental emergency? 
It is important to see your dentist as soon as possible after a dental emergency. If the tooth has become dislodged or come out completely, retrieve the tooth and rinse it if it is dirty. However, try to hold the tooth by its crown and do not scrub any remaining tissue off of the roots. Place the tooth in a small container of milk or a store-bought solution like Save-A-Tooth. If the tooth breaks into pieces, retrieve the pieces and place them into the solution or milk and bring them with you to your emergency dental appointment. If you have a toothache or abscessed tooth, try swishing with warm salt water until you can get into your dentist’s office.

Dental Emergencies in Apple Valley, CA
The best thing you can do during a dental emergency is to stay calm and remember the best practices for the situation you find yourself in. For more information on dental emergencies or what you should do during one, please contact Dr. Kim at Apple Valley Dental in Apple Valley, CA. Call (760) 247-6007 to schedule your emergency appointment.

By Apple Valley Dental
December 29, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: bad breath  
ProperCleaningTechniquescanHelpyouControlChronicBadBreath

We all experience the occasional bout of bad breath from dry mouth or after eating certain foods. Chronic halitosis, on the other hand, could have an underlying health cause like periodontal (gum) disease, sinus infections or even systemic illnesses like diabetes. Anyone with persistent halitosis should undergo a thorough examination to determine the root cause.

If such an examination rules out a more serious cause, it’s then possible the particular population of bacteria that inhabit your mouth (out of a possible 600 or more strains) and your body’s response makes you more susceptible to halitosis. After feeding on food remnants, dead skin cells or post-nasal drip, certain types of bacteria excrete volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) that give off an odor similar to “rotten eggs.”

In this case, we want to reduce the bacterial population through plaque removal, which in turn reduces the levels of VSCs. Our approach then is effective oral hygiene and perhaps a few cleanings — the basics every person should practice for good oral health — along with a few extra measures specific to chronic halitosis.

This calls for brushing and flossing your teeth daily. This will remove much of the plaque, the main breeding and feeding ground for bacteria, that has accumulated over the preceding twenty-four hours. In some cases, we may also recommend the use of an interproximal brush that is more adept in removing plaque clinging to areas between the teeth.

You may also need to pay special attention in cleaning another oral structure contributing to your bad breath — your tongue. The back of the tongue in particular is a “hideout” for bacteria: relatively dry and poorly cleansed because of its convoluted microscopic structure, bacteria often thrive undisturbed under a continually-forming tongue coating. Simply brushing the tongue may not be enough — you may also need to use a tongue scraper, a dental device that removes this coating. (For more information, see the Dear Doctor article, “Tongue Scraping.”)

Last but not least, visit our office for cleanings and checkups at least twice a year. Professional cleanings remove bacterial plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) you’re unable to reach and remove with daily hygiene measures. Following this and the other steps described above will go a long way toward eliminating your bad breath, as well as enhancing your total oral health.

If you would like more information on treating chronic bad breath, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More Than Just Embarrassing.”

TakingCareofOralHealthCrucialtoQualityofLifeforHIVPositivePatients

In the early Eighties, dentists began noticing symptoms among a few patients that indicated something far more serious. They were, in fact, among the first healthcare providers to recognize what we now know as HIV-AIDS.

Today, about 1.2 million Americans have contracted the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). It’s a retrovirus, somewhat different than other viruses: it can invade immune system cells and hijack their replication mechanism to reproduce itself. Untreated it eventually destroys these cells to give rise to the more serious, life-threatening disease Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

Thanks to antiretroviral drugs, most HIV positive patients live somewhat normal lives and avoid the more serious Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). But while antiretroviral therapy effectively inhibits the action of the virus, it isn’t a cure — the virus is a permanent resident of the body and can still affect health, especially in the mouth.

In this regard, one of the more common conditions associated with HIV is Candidiasis, a fungal infection also known as thrush, which causes cracking of the mouth corners and lesions or white patches on the surface of the tongue or roof of the mouth. HIV patients may also experience limited saliva flow that causes dry mouth (xerostomia) with effects that range from bad breath to a higher risk of tooth decay.

The most serious effect, though, of HIV on oral health is the body’s lower resistance to fight periodontal (gum) disease. HIV patients are especially susceptible to a severe form known as Necrotizing Ulcerative Periodontitis (NUP), a sign as well of immune system deterioration and the beginning of AIDS. This painful condition causes gum ulcerations, extensive bleeding, and the rapid deterioration of gum attachment to teeth.

If you or a family member is HIV positive, you’ll need to pay close attention to oral health. Besides diligent brushing and flossing, you or they should also regularly visit the dentist. These visits not only provide diagnosis and treatment of dental problems, they’re also an important monitoring point for gauging the extent of the HIV infection.

Taking care of dental problems will also ease some of the discomfort associated with HIV. Thanks to proper oral care, you or someone you love can experience a higher quality of life.

If you would like more information on oral and dental health for patients with HIV, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Apple Valley Dental
October 30, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: jaw pain   tmj  

Have you been wondering why your jaw has started to ache? Your dentist Dr. Samuel Kim in Apple Valley, CA and serving patients in jaw painLucerne Valley shares a few common causes of the pain.

Grinding

Grinding your teeth, or even clenching them, strains your jaw muscles while you sleep. As a result, you'll wake up with a stiff, achy jaw. Because grinding can cause enamel erosion and cracked teeth and restorations, it shouldn't be ignored.

Bite problems

A bite problem occurs when your teeth don't fit together as they should. A bad bite strains your jaw joints and muscles and also cause other unpleasant symptoms, such as gum disease, enamel erosion, difficulty chewing and trouble pronouncing words easily.

Bacterial infections

An abscess, a bacterial infection that affects tooth pulp, or osteomyelitis, a bone infection, may be responsible for your pain. If you have any of these symptoms, you may also develop a fever and swollen lymph glands. Both of these conditions are dental emergencies and require immediate treatment in our Lucerne Valley office.

Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD)

TMD, also called TMJ, causes pain in your jaw joints, muscles, ligaments or tendons. In addition to pain, you may experience frequent headaches, jaw locking, neck or upper back pain, ear pain and popping or clicking sounds accompanied by pain.

How is jaw pain treated?

Ice, heat and over-the-counter pain medication can be helpful if your jaw pain is mild. It's also a good idea to avoid eating hard foods if your jaw hurts. If your pain doesn't go away in a few days, is severe or is accompanied by a fever, call our office to schedule an appointment.

We recommend a variety of treatments that will help ease your pain. For example, a nightguard can help decrease pressure on your jaw caused by grinding, while orthodontic treatment will realign your teeth, eliminating bite problems. Abscesses are treated with root canals and antibiotics. Antibiotics are also needed if you have osteomyelitis. TMD pain can be relieved with an oral splint, a device that repositions your jaw while you sleep, reducing pressure and pain.

Interested in finding out how you can relieve your jaw pain? Call Apple Valley, CA dentist Dr. Samuel Kim serving patients in Lucerne Valley at (760) 247-6007.