Apple Valley Dental Discussion

Posts for category: Oral Health

By Apple Valley Dental
March 06, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  

In aggressive cases of gum disease, a surgical procedure is often needed to reverse the progression of bone loss. But it’s not always gum diseasenecessary to have invasive periodontal surgery to cure gum disease if you have it treated in the earliest stages. You may be a candidate for the non-surgical treatments available at Apple Valley Dental serving Lucerne Valley, CA.

Gum Disease Signs and Symptoms
While tooth decay generally threatens a tooth from the inside, gum disease threatens it from the outside. The supporting gum structure that holds the tooth in its socket becomes compromised by bad bacteria, causing the tooth to lose its stability over a period of time. Here are a few of the signs and symptoms of gum disease:

- The gums look red and irritated.
- Blood frequently shows up after brushing or flossing.
- The gums start to separate from the teeth, creating deep pockets.
- The mouth has an unusually unpleasant taste and odor.

Non-Surgical Treatments
In serious cases of gum disease, periodontal surgery may not be avoidable. But in the earlier stages, your Apple Valley and Lucerne Valley dentist will likely try one or more of these non-surgical treatments:

- Scaling and root planing (a deep cleaning that removes hardened calculus).
- Laser therapy (laser targets bad tissue while leaving good tissue unharmed).
- Antibiotic therapy (medication that controls the bacteria that causes bone loss).
- Gum grafting (adding natural or artificial gum tissue to make the gumline stronger).

Preventing Gum Disease
If you have a family or personal history of gum disease, there are steps you can take to prevent gum disease in the future. Observe these tips:

- Floss as often as you brush to stop plaque in its tracks, and do a very thorough job each time.
- Eat foods that promote good bone and gum health, including calcium, potassium, and vitamin A, C, and D.
- Join a smoking cessation program so that you can eliminate tobacco products from your routine.

Explore Your Options
Find out more about the non-surgical solutions available for patients who have been diagnosed with gum disease. Call (760) 247-6007 today to schedule an appointment with Dr. Samuel Kim at Apple Valley Dental serving Lucerne Valley, CA.

By Apple Valley Dental
February 28, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: celebrity smiles   teething  
TeethingTroublesMakeTennisSuperstarNot-So-Serena

In February, the American Dental Association sponsors Children’s Dental Health Month to raise awareness about the importance of good oral health for kids of all ages. It’s a great time to focus on concerns unique to children—teething, for example. This stage of development can be stressful for children and parents alike. Just ask tennis legend (and new mom) Serena Williams. When her baby daughter recently began teething, the Olympic gold medalist and multi-Grand-Slam champion asked her instagram followers for help:

“Teething… is so hard. Poor Alexis Olympia has been so uncomfortable. She cried so much… I almost need my mom to come and hold me to sleep cause I’m so stressed. Help? Anyone?”

We certainly sympathize with Serena’s plight. The process of teething—where a child’s primary teeth start to emerge (erupt) from below the gum line—can make both baby and parents irritable in the daytime and sleepless at night. While a few infants are born with tiny teeth already showing, most kids’ teeth begin emerging at age 4-7 months.

Teething is an important milestone in baby’s growth…but it’s one that’s not always cause for celebration. It can lead to pain, drooling, gnawing, and biting; ear rubbing and gum swelling; decreased appetite and disrupted sleeping patterns. And did we mention that irritability and stress are common as well? But if you notice fever, diarrhea, or widespread rash, it may be wise to consult your dentist or pediatrician.

What can you do to ease the discomfort of teething? The American Dental Association (ADA) has a few recommendations: Try soothing the gums by rubbing them gently with a clean finger or a cool, moist towel or washcloth; or let your baby chew on a cold (but not frozen) teething ring or pacifier.

If your pediatrician recommends it, over-the-counter medications like acetaminophen or ibuprofen can be used for persistent teething pain—but make sure to use the correct dosage and wait the proper amount of time between doses.

There are also a few things you should NEVER do. Don’t give alcohol to a baby in any form, and don’t rub any medications on baby’s gums. Don’t give a baby anything to chew on that’s unsafe (bones, breakable items, etc). And don’t use teething gels containing benzociane, lidocaine or certain homeopathic ingredients: According to a recent FDA warning, they may pose a danger to infants, including risks of rare but serious medical conditions. Feel free to check with us if you are not sure whether a particular remedy is safe for your baby.

There’s no doubt that teething can be stressful. But it’s a sign of normal development—and in time it will pass…like babyhood itself. If you’re concerned about your child’s teething or would like more information, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teething Troubles.”

By Apple Valley Dental
January 21, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
EncourageYourCollege-BoundChildtoPracticeGoodOralHealthHabits

It's a big transition when your child enters college — for both of you. You may find “cutting the apron strings” a little rocky at times.

But like most parents, you'll soon condense what you still want your college kid to do down to a few major habits and choices. Be sure to keep health, diet and lifestyle choices on that list, areas which could have the most effect on their long-term health and well-being.

That should include dental care. Hopefully, they've already developed good hygiene habits like daily brushing and flossing and regular dental visits. But, on their own now, they're faced with other choices that could affect their dental health.

For example, eating a balanced, nutritious diet is necessary for a healthy mouth. That includes limiting sugar intake, especially when snacking. Disease-causing oral bacteria thrive on carbohydrates like sugar. These bacteria also secrete acid, which at consistently high levels can erode tooth enamel.

Tobacco smoking and excessive alcohol affect teeth and gums because both can inhibit secretion of saliva. Besides containing antibodies that fight infection, saliva also neutralizes mouth acid. A dry mouth caused by these habits, could put their mouth at higher risk for disease.

Your college student might also be influenced by the fashion of their peers to display piercings. Mouth piercings with lip or tongue hardware in particular can damage teeth. The constant movement and friction erodes enamel or may even cause a tooth fracture. If possible, try to steer them to self-expression that poses less risk to their dental health.

There's one other area that, believe it or not, could impact dental health: sex. While each family handles this particular subject differently, be sure your child knows that some forms of sexual activity increase the risk for contracting the human papilloma virus (HPV16). Among its many destructive outcomes, HPV16 profoundly raises the risk of oral cancer, a rare but deadly disease with a poor survival rate.

Going from home to college is a big step for a young person — and their parents. As a parent, you can help steer them to practice good habits and make wise choices that will protect their lives and health and, in particular, their teeth and gums.

If you would like more information on helping your college student maintain their dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “10 Health Tips for College Students.”

By Apple Valley Dental
January 19, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Dental Emergencies  

Dental emergencies can cause even the most calm, cool, and collected individuals to panic. Luckily, your dentist can help you prepare for dental emergencythese uncomfortable situations and know exactly what to do to save your tooth and dental health. Find out everything you need to know about dental emergencies and more with Dr. Samuel Kim at Apple Valley Dental in Apple Valley, CA.

What is considered a dental emergency? 
Dental emergencies often involve injuries to the mouth which do serious damage to one or more teeth. In addition to damage to the teeth, a dental emergency can also include damage to the oral tissues like the cheeks, tongue, or gums. One of the most common dental emergencies occurs when an injury or accident knocks a tooth from the mouth, fractures a tooth, or significantly loosens the tooth. However, dental emergencies can also occur when a tooth becomes severely infected and abscessed.

What should I do during a dental emergency? 
It is important to see your dentist as soon as possible after a dental emergency. If the tooth has become dislodged or come out completely, retrieve the tooth and rinse it if it is dirty. However, try to hold the tooth by its crown and do not scrub any remaining tissue off of the roots. Place the tooth in a small container of milk or a store-bought solution like Save-A-Tooth. If the tooth breaks into pieces, retrieve the pieces and place them into the solution or milk and bring them with you to your emergency dental appointment. If you have a toothache or abscessed tooth, try swishing with warm salt water until you can get into your dentist’s office.

Dental Emergencies in Apple Valley, CA
The best thing you can do during a dental emergency is to stay calm and remember the best practices for the situation you find yourself in. For more information on dental emergencies or what you should do during one, please contact Dr. Kim at Apple Valley Dental in Apple Valley, CA. Call (760) 247-6007 to schedule your emergency appointment.

By Apple Valley Dental
December 29, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: bad breath  
ProperCleaningTechniquescanHelpyouControlChronicBadBreath

We all experience the occasional bout of bad breath from dry mouth or after eating certain foods. Chronic halitosis, on the other hand, could have an underlying health cause like periodontal (gum) disease, sinus infections or even systemic illnesses like diabetes. Anyone with persistent halitosis should undergo a thorough examination to determine the root cause.

If such an examination rules out a more serious cause, it’s then possible the particular population of bacteria that inhabit your mouth (out of a possible 600 or more strains) and your body’s response makes you more susceptible to halitosis. After feeding on food remnants, dead skin cells or post-nasal drip, certain types of bacteria excrete volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) that give off an odor similar to “rotten eggs.”

In this case, we want to reduce the bacterial population through plaque removal, which in turn reduces the levels of VSCs. Our approach then is effective oral hygiene and perhaps a few cleanings — the basics every person should practice for good oral health — along with a few extra measures specific to chronic halitosis.

This calls for brushing and flossing your teeth daily. This will remove much of the plaque, the main breeding and feeding ground for bacteria, that has accumulated over the preceding twenty-four hours. In some cases, we may also recommend the use of an interproximal brush that is more adept in removing plaque clinging to areas between the teeth.

You may also need to pay special attention in cleaning another oral structure contributing to your bad breath — your tongue. The back of the tongue in particular is a “hideout” for bacteria: relatively dry and poorly cleansed because of its convoluted microscopic structure, bacteria often thrive undisturbed under a continually-forming tongue coating. Simply brushing the tongue may not be enough — you may also need to use a tongue scraper, a dental device that removes this coating. (For more information, see the Dear Doctor article, “Tongue Scraping.”)

Last but not least, visit our office for cleanings and checkups at least twice a year. Professional cleanings remove bacterial plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) you’re unable to reach and remove with daily hygiene measures. Following this and the other steps described above will go a long way toward eliminating your bad breath, as well as enhancing your total oral health.

If you would like more information on treating chronic bad breath, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More Than Just Embarrassing.”